Current Issue

Nov.18, 2009

Vol. 111, No. 5

memorial

Harold W. Arberg Sr. ’40

Published in the Nov.18, 2009, issue

Bud died of pneumonia Aug. 4, 2009, at Virginia Hospital Center in Arlington.

Yick Kuwayama, who attended the funeral, reported, “It was quite a service, run by his godchildren and children. They called it a celebration.”

The Los Angeles Times and The Washington Post featured extensive obituaries on Harold’s musical contributions to the Army, namely, his revised lyrics to “The Caissons Go Rolling Along,” which became “The Army Goes Rolling Along” — official song of the U.S. Army. We also thank Calvin MacCracken’s son, Mike ’64, for his mailing.

After Montclair (N.J.) High School, Bud majored in music at Princeton, where he was a member of the Glee Club, Triangle Club, International Relations Club, the Christian Science Organization, and Key and Seal. He graduated with honors.

During World War II, he served with the Army in the Persian Gulf Command. He then earned a master’s and doctoral degrees in education from Columbia University before being recalled to duty during the Korean War. Bud later became director of the arts and humanities division of the Department of Education in Washington.

Although Bud composed more than 100 musical numbers, we aver that “Forward with Forty” ranks at the top. Bud enlivened reunions, leading songfests from the piano bench.

To his survivors, wife Jane (Phillips); sons Harold Jr., Phillips, Charles, and Robert; eight grandchildren; and one great-granddaughter, his classmates extend their deep sympathies.

The Class of 1940

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