Current Issue

Jan.19, 2011

Vol. 111, No. 6

memorial

Arthur F. Hopper Jr. ’38

Published in the Jan.19, 2011, issue

Art died Feb. 13, 2008, and was buried at sea in Narragansett Bay, R.I., where he spent his early retirement years sailing his Tanzer 22 Pourquoi Pas? He was 90.

He graduated from Plainfield (N.J.) High School and received an A.B. in biology with honors from Princeton. He earned a master’s degree in zoology from Yale and a Ph.D. in zoology from Northeastern University.

During World War II he served in meteorology services with the Army, and after the war served in the Army Reserve, retiring as a lieutenant colonel.

He began his long and distinguished academic career as an assistant professor at Wayne University in 1948 before becoming an assistant professor at Rutgers University in 1949. He remained at Rutgers until his retirement in 1978 as professor emeritus. Art was the author of many scholarly works and articles on embryology, regeneration, and radiation biology and was co-author of the textbook Foundations of Animal Development.

He was active in community affairs, serving as president of the Bedminster and Somerset County (N.J.) boards of education, and as a Little League coach and Boy Scout troop leader.

Art married Amy Patricia Hull in 1940. She predeceased him in 1982. He subsequently married Patricia A. Vennet of Palm Beach, Fla., who survives him.

He also is survived by four sons, Arthur F. III, Geoffrey, Christopher, and Gregory; nine grandchildren; and eight great-grandchildren, to all of whom the class extends its sincere sympathy.

The Class of 1938

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