Current Issue

June2, 2010

Vol. 110, No. 15

memorial

Charles Scudder Winston Jr. ’41

Published in the June2, 2010, issue

Chuck died Feb.15, 2010, in St. Simons Island, Ga.

He came to Princeton from Joliet (Ill.) High School. At Princeton he majored in psychology, was a member of Tiger Inn, and graduated with honors. He played freshman and varsity basketball, and was awarded the Benjamin F. Bunn Trophy for sportsmanship. He also was on the football and rugby teams. In addition, Chuck chaired the class memorial fund committee and the Student-Faculty Association.

In 1942, he joined the Navy as an ensign, serving on torpedo boats. He spent a year as executive officer of MTB RON 17 in the Philippines, and was separated as a lieutenant in 1946.

Chuck’s entire business career was with the advertising agency Foote, Cone & Belding. He became president in 1967 and was vice chairman from 1970 to 1979, after which he retired.

Among many community positions, Chuck served as president of the Infant Welfare Society of Chicago and was on the executive planning board of the Chicago-area council of the Boy Scouts. He was instrumental in establishing the Little Traverse Conservancy, which served northern Michigan.

Chuck was predeceased by his former wives, Frances Barhett Winston, Sarah Chapin Winston, and Lou Byrne Winston. He is survived by his wife, Joan Seaton Winston; daughters Pamela, Julia, Frances, and Eliza; stepdaughters Susan and Kathleen; stepson Flint; 15 grandchildren; 19 great-grandchildren; nine step-grandchildren; and two step-great-grandchildren.

The Class of 1941

Post a remembrance
Post a remembrance
Charles Scudder Winston Jr.
Enter the word as it appears in the picture below
Send
By submitting a comment, you agree to PAW's comment posting policy.
CURRENT ISSUE: June2, 2010

Memorials Search:

Search:
mudd archive memorials
PAW's online memorial repository currently contains the full text of all memorials published since 1989. To find a memorial published in PAW before this time period, please check the Mudd Library Archives.
no space