Four alumni recognized for service

From left: Williams ’84, Wright ’51, Onyshkevych ’83, and Fiori *03
From left: Williams ’84, Wright ’51, Onyshkevych ’83, and Fiori *03
Sameer A. Khan

Vsevolod “Sev” Onyshkevych ’83’s commitment to Princeton volunteerism began when he was a high school student and discovered letters written by 18th-century students at The College of New Jersey, which later changed its name to Princeton. “Freddie Fox ’39 — the keeper of Princetoniana — got word of my [collection] and took me under his wings,” Onyshkevych said, “and I’m tickled pink to be chair of the Princetoniana Committee now, which has 35 people carrying on Freddie’s work.” For his efforts, Onyshkevych, who has served as ’83’s secretary and historian, a P-rade marshal, schools-committee interviewer, and Alumni Association regional president, was among four alumni to receive an honor given to Fox: the Service to Princeton Award.

At Wesley Wright ’51’s graduation, his father encouraged him to “give back” to the University — and he has heeded that advice. A former chair of the Alumni Association, Wright has served for 55 years as a schools-committee interviewer and held a variety of national and class leadership positions, including class president and class agent. Through his volunteer work, Wright said, Princeton has continued to educate him: He has learned how to run a major capital campaign and establish an alumni-giving program, among other things.

When Debbie Scott Williams ’84 heard civil-rights leader U.S. Rep. John Lewis speak in 2005 at the inaugural ceremony of the Atlanta chapter of the Princeton Prize in Race Relations, she knew she had to get involved. Today, after serving as a regional chair and the national vice chair of the prize committee, Williams leads the Princeton Prize efforts nationally. She also has been class secretary and interviewed Princeton applicants. “My current service to Princeton,” she said, “allows me the great privilege to meet and recognize young people who are present-day drum majors for justice.”

Anthony J. Fiori *03, outgoing president of the Association of Princeton Graduate Alumni, promptly began volunteering when he arrived at Princeton in 2001. The former Graduate Student Government representative has served the APGA as board member, treasurer, and vice president, and held leadership positions for graduate Annual Giving. Last fall, Fiori helped to plan the “Many Minds, Many Stripes” graduate-alumni conference, which drew nearly 1,000 people to campus. “Being at the helm of the APGA during this time has been incredibly rewarding,” he said.