Ousterhout ’11
Ousterhout ’11
Courtesy Kay Ousterhout ’11
Myhrvold ’11
Myhrvold ’11
Denise Applewhite/Office of Communications


Seniors Kay Ousterhout and Cameron Myhrvold have received $250,000 HERTZ FELLOWSHIPS, which support five years of doctoral study in applied physical and biological sciences. Ousterhout, a computer science concentrator, plans to study distributed systems and networking of services like Gmail, Facebook, and Twitter. Myhrvold, a molecular biology major and certificate candidate in quantitative and com­puta­tional biology, is interested in “synthetic biology, signaling, and the origins of life.” The fellowships are no-strings-attached grants designed to encourage innovation by young scientists.  

In the U.S. News and World Report rankings of BEST GRADUATE SCHOOLS IN ­ENGINEERING, Princeton’s School of Engineering and Applied Science tied for 18th with Harvard (MIT was ranked first). Among specific programs, Princeton ranked sixth in chemical engineering, seventh in aerospace, 10th in computer science and in mechanical engineering, 11th in electrical engineering, and 27th in civil and in environmental engineering. Steven Schultz, director of engineering communications, said the magazine’s ranking methodology favors larger schools. “We do well in the rankings of individual departments, where size is not a factor,” he said.  

Rigolot
Rigolot
Lilia Xie ’14/The Daily Princetonian
Professor FRANÇOIS RIGOLOT, professor of French literature, received the Paul Oskar Kristeller Lifetime Achievement Award from the Renaissance Society of America March 26 in Montreal. William J. Kennedy, former president of the society, said Rigolot “is without question one of the most distinguished scholars and critics of Renaissance literary text in the world, and is renowned as the exemplar and tireless champion of French Renaissance studies in North America.”