There have been many changes to the Nassau Street restaurant landscape, with the ­56-year-old Carousel becoming the latest eatery to close. It will be replaced by a chain restaurant, one of several that have opened in recent years. Here’s a snapshot of selected eating spots along Nassau Street, past and present.

Photo: Historical Society of Princeton

RENWICK’S (CLOSED)
50 Nassau St.
1901–1970
Now: Ralph Lauren
Known as Wicks — and located at various locations along Nassau Street in its 70-year history — this Princeton landmark started as an ice cream parlor and hosted hamburger-eating contests in the ’50s. 

Photo: Frank Wojciechowski

ZORBA’S BROTHER
80 Nassau St.
Opened 2003
This classic Greek diner serves salads and souvlaki to its many fans, including members of the University’s staff.

Photo: Historical Society of Princeton

THE BALT (CLOSED)
82 Nassau St.
1920s–1963
Now: Paper Source
This tiled-wall classic (full name: the Baltimore Dairy Lunch) was a student haunt for more than four decades. Now it’s a fancy stationery shop. 

Photo: Frank Wojciechowski

LAHIERE’S (CLOSED)
5 Witherspoon St.
1919–2010
Now: vacant
Albert Einstein ate lunch here, and it was the place your parents took you for shrimp cocktail and rack of lamb when they visited. It closed in 2010. No word on what will replace it.

Photo: Frank Wojciechowski

STARBUCKS
100 Nassau St.
Opened 1996
The coffee mecca competes with local favorite Small World Coffee on Witherspoon Street.

Photo: Frank Wojciechowski

MASSIMO’S
110 Nassau St.
Opened 1973
Decorated in orange and black — and festooned with ­banners from Princeton and its Ivy League brethren — Massimo’s dishes up pizza and pasta to hungry students. 

Photo: Frank Wojciechowski

THE ANNEX (CLOSED)
128 Nassau St.
1930s–2006
Now: Princeton Sports Bar & Grill (shown above)
The beloved Annex — with its stained-glass roaring tiger and old football-team photos — was replaced first with Italian restaurant Sotto, and is now a burger-and-nacho joint.

Photo: Frank Wojciechowski

PANERA BREAD
136 Nassau St.
Opened 2001
This spot finds students munching muffins and checking email using the free Wi-Fi.

Photo: Frank Wojciechowski

TRIUMPH BREWING COMPANY
138 Nassau St.
Opened 1995
Behind the lively bar — a favorite hangout for Princeton staffers — is the seven-barrel, stainless-steel brewery where craft beers are made.

Photo: Frank Wojciechowski

QDOBA MEXICAN GRILL
140 Nassau St.
Opened 2011
This newcomer — a national chain — dishes out huge burritos to ­students on a budget.

Photo: Frank Wojciechowski

PJ’S PANCAKE HOUSE
154 Nassau St.
Opened 1962
Students huddle in line under heat lamps on weekends; once inside, they carve their names in the wooden tables, if they can find an empty spot.

Photo: Frank Wojciechowski

NAKED PIZZA
180 Nassau St.
Opened 2011
This chain calls its pizza “all-natural” with “no freaky chemicals”; students perch on outside benches, since there’s no seating.

Photo: Frank Wojciechowski

CAROUSEL (CLOSED)
182 Nassau St.
1955–2011
Opening spring 2012: Cheeburger Cheeburger
A favorite of Cornel West *80 and other faculty members, this breakfast-all-day diner — known for the carousel horses in the window and ­originally located farther east on Nassau Street — is giving way to a burger chain with a ’50s motif.

Photo: Princeton Alumni Weekly, April 4, 1990

GREENLINE DINER (DESTROYED)
179 Nassau St.
1981–1990
This natural-foods restaurant — later known as the American Diner — was destroyed by a spectacular fire in 1990.

Photo: Frank Wojciechowski

ZORBA’S GRILL
183 Nassau St.
Opened 1990
Outdoor tables make this Greek takeout spot a draw on sunny days.

Photo: Frank Wojciechowski

HOAGIE HAVEN
242 Nassau St.
Opened early 1970s
The ultimate student hangout, known for serving the cheapest, greasiest sandwiches around; there are crowds here at 2 a.m. Says James Paddon ’88: “Anyone who does not say Hoagie Haven (is their favorite place to eat in Princeton) should have their degree revoked.”

Tell us about your favorite place to eat in Princeton, then and now, in the comments section below.