Nobel Winners’ Princeton Ties

Arthur McDonald
Arthur McDonald
Lars Hagberg/Reuters

Among this year’s Nobel Prize winners were two scholars whose research has roots in their years at Princeton. Former physics professor Arthur McDonald, top photo, one of two recipients of the prize in physics, was recognized for his work in proving the existence of neutrino oscillations and showing that neutrinos have mass. McDonald is professor of physics emeritus at Queen’s University in Canada. He taught at Princeton from 1982 to 1989, a period when he began developing the large experiment called the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory.

Tomas Lindahl
Tomas Lindahl
Alastair Grant/AP Images

Tomas Lindahl, who conducted some of his doctoral research at the University in the mid-1960s, was one of three winners of the chemistry prize. He was cited for his contributions to studies of how DNA repairs itself. Lindahl is a researcher at the Francis Crick Institute and Clare Hall Laboratory in the United Kingdom. At Princeton he worked with Jacques Fresco, now professor emeritus in the life sciences, publishing papers that became the basis for Lindahl’s work on DNA damage.