From his pro baseball career through his time as a World War II spy, Moe Berg ’23 followed a fascinating path. These four pieces, chosen from the University Library’s new Berg papers, illustrate some key moments.

Read more about Berg – and the newly acquired papers – here.

Moe Berg '23 and player-manager Joe Cronin in the Boston Red Sox dugout, circa 1937. Berg played in the major leagues for 15 seasons, mostly as a backup catcher, compiling a .243 lifetime batting average.
Moe Berg '23 and player-manager Joe Cronin in the Boston Red Sox dugout, circa 1937. Berg played in the major leagues for 15 seasons, mostly as a backup catcher, compiling a .243 lifetime batting average.
Courtesy of the Moe Berg Papers, Manuscripts Division, Department of Rare Books and Special Collections, Princeton University Library
Berg used his foreign language skills to collect intelligence in Europe during World War II, working for the Office of Strategic Services. In 1944, he was issued this "certificate of identity of non-combatant" to carry during his travels.
Berg used his foreign language skills to collect intelligence in Europe during World War II, working for the Office of Strategic Services. In 1944, he was issued this "certificate of identity of non-combatant" to carry during his travels.
Courtesy of the Moe Berg Papers, Manuscripts Division, Department of Rare Books and Special Collections, Princeton University Library
Berg poses with Allied military officials in Oslo, Norway, in June 1945. After the war, his work as a spy dwindled.
Berg poses with Allied military officials in Oslo, Norway, in June 1945. After the war, his work as a spy dwindled.
Courtesy of the Moe Berg Papers, Manuscripts Division, Department of Rare Books and Special Collections, Princeton University Library
When Berg was selected to receive the Presidential Medal of Freedom, he declined the award. In this draft of his letter of refusal, he downplays his espionage work as a "very modest contribution."
When Berg was selected to receive the Presidential Medal of Freedom, he declined the award. In this draft of his letter of refusal, he downplays his espionage work as a "very modest contribution."
Courtesy of the Moe Berg Papers, Manuscripts Division, Department of Rare Books and Special Collections, Princeton University Library