Professor Anthony Grafton reads from his new book, “Codex in Crisis,” at Labyrinth Books in May.
Professor Anthony Grafton reads from his new book, “Codex in Crisis,” at Labyrinth Books in May.
Courtesy Nealin Parker
In his latest book, Codex in Crisis , published by Crumpled Press in May, history professor Anthony Grafton reflects on the staggering amount of information now available on the Web: millions of digitized books, scholarly journals, and archival material accessible to anyone with a laptop and Internet access. He looks at how digitization has changed the nature of reading, scholarship, and publishing, and examines the future of books and libraries. Grafton, who calls himself “a lover of old libraries,” says there are some things a scholar can learn only by studying printed books in bricks-and-mortar libraries. Grafton spoke with PAW’s Katherine Federici Greenwood.

How has the Web changed the nature of research for scholars and students?



Why are actual books and archives still necessary?

The Wealth of Nations

Codex in Crisis