PHOTO: ARCHITECTURAL ASSOCIATION PHOTO LIBRARY

Noted architecture critic ALAN COLQUHOUN, a faculty member from 1981 to 1991, died of natural causes Dec. 13 in London. He was 91. The Class of 1913 Lecturer in Architecture emeritus, Colquhoun graduated from the Architectural Association in London and taught at Harvard, Cambridge University, and several other schools of architecture while continuing to practice with his firm, Colquhoun & Miller. His influence as a critic grew following the 1981 publication of his acclaimed Essays in Architectural Criticism. His last book, Collected Essays in Architectural Criticism, was published in 2009.

PHOTO: EDWARD BERGER

CHARLES GILVARG, professor emeritus of molecular biology, died Jan. 6 in Scottsdale, Ariz., ­following a stroke. He was 87. Gilvarg, known as a demanding teacher, spent 34 years at the Univer­sity, seeing its program in biochemical sciences evolve into a department and serving as the first chairman of the Department of ­Biochemical Sciences (later the molecular biology department). His work on amino-acid biosynthesis and ­transport was important in the biochemical-research renaissance of the 1960s and ’70s. At the time of his death, Gilvarg was awaiting results about the efficacy of a biological indicator of ­early-stage pancreatic cancer he had been researching.

PHOTO: AIP EMILIO SEGRE VISUAL ARCHIVES, PHYSICS TODAY COLLECTION

Renowned mathematical physicist ARTHUR STRONG WIGHTMAN *49, a faculty member from 1949 to 1992, died Jan. 13 of Alz­heimer’s disease in Edison, N.J. He was 90. Considered a founder of modern mathe­matical physics, he provided an axiomatic approach to quantum field theory and originated the Wightman theorems. He received the inaugural Henri Poincaré Prize in 1997, among other awards.