Jim Marshall ’72
Jim Marshall ’72
PHOTO: COURTESY USIP

Former U.S. ­congressman JIM MARSHALL ’72 was sworn in Sept. 14 as president of the United States Institute of Peace in Washington, D.C. Established by Congress in 1984, the nonpartisan institute aims to prevent international conflict without resorting to violence.


ROBERT A. CARO ’57 was nominated for a National Book Award for The Passage of Power, the fourth volume of his biography The Years of Lyndon Johnson; and Susan Wheeler, director of Princeton’s Program in Creative Writing, was nominated for her poetry collection Meme. The winners were scheduled to be announced Nov. 14.


Laurence Pope *77
Laurence Pope *77
PHOTO: REUTERS/ISMAIL ZITOUNY

LAURENCE POPE *77, who was a visiting graduate student in the Near Eastern studies department in 1976–77, is the new top U.S. diplomat in Libya. In October, the U.S. State Department announced that Pope, a retired U.S. Foreign Service officer who had served 31 years and been U.S. Ambassador to Chad, had arrived in Tripoli as chargé d’affaires, a month after Ambassador Christopher Stevens was killed in Benghazi.


Amy Madden ’75
Amy Madden ’75
PHOTO: COURTESY AMY MADDEN ’75

AMY MADDEN ’75, a blues and rock bassist and songwriter, was inducted into the New York Blues Hall of Fame in August.


A new play by RICHARD GREENBERG ’80, Truman Capote’s ‘Breakfast at Tiffany’s,’ is scheduled to open on Broadway in February, reported The New York Times. Greenberg said in a statement that he hoped “to return to the original setting of the novella, which is the New York of the Second World War, as well as to resume its tone — still stylish and romantic, yes, but rougher-edged and more candid than people generally remember.”